Series: 1917: The view from the streets

Read leaflets, statements and other documents from the 1917 Russian Revolution in a series edited by John Riddell.
  • A Bolshevik appeal finds an echo in the streets

    Two proclamations issued in Petrograd show how the radicalization of workers and soldiers led more people to the Bolsheviks.

  • Responses to the July Days uprising

    Two appeals from 100 years ago show the deepening conflict among Russian socialists as a new struggle for power took place.

  • The Bolsheviks retreat in order to advance

    The Bolsheviks' response to repression after the July Days uprising was to avoid provocations and prepare for future struggle.

  • On the left sat the Bolsheviks

    An eyewitness to the Russian Revolution describes how the Petrograd of the workers developed a different attitude to Bolshevism.

  • The soldiers in revolt

    A witness to the Russian Revolution learns about the grim toll of the First World War and the spreading revolt in the Tsar's armies.

  • Comrades of the sea

    A journalist in revolutionary Russia in 1917 describes his encounters sailors who were part of the struggle to make the world anew.

  • The mighty cry of "All power to the Soviets"

    A witness to the revolution tells how failing confidence in the Provisional Government was replaced by hope in workers' councils.

  • Making a new date in history

    An American journalist who witnessed the Russian Revolution describes the day when a workers' government was finally achieved.

  • The taking of the Winter Palace

    The old order's last holdouts surrendered at the Tsar's palace in Petrograd--which was protected as the property of all the people.

  • The red convicts of Cherm

    An American journalist in Russia during the revolution describes a visit to a penal colony that was transformed by workers' power.