National

  • The roots of racism and rebellion in Ferguson

    The racism and inequality woven into Ferguson's history created the conditions for both Mike Brown's murder and the powerful protests against it.

  • A civil liberties emergency

    An ACLU staffer present at the protests in Ferguson, Mo., describes the routine violations of basic rights that he's witnessed.

  • Where is labor in Ferguson?

    It is imperative that unions reach out to African Americans as partners in the struggle for economic and social rights.

  • The crimes of Rick Perry

    The prospect of the Texas Republican governor facing criminal charges is enough to being a smile to any progressive's face.

  • The second assassination of Mike Brown

    He was shot down by a police officer on the streets of Ferguson, Mo. Then the media took aim, and he was assassinated all over again.

  • Scenes from a city in revolt

    A collection of photos taken in Ferguson, Mo., provides a glimpse of the popular resistance to police violence.

  • Keeping apartheid at Bay

    Protests by Palestine solidarity activists and action by Oakland port workers stopped the unloading of an Israeli-owned ship.

  • Support floods in for Steven Salaita

    A public campaign in support the fired pro-Palestinian professor Steven Salaita has generated more than 15,000 signatures.

  • Ferguson is fighting back

    SocialistWorker.org writers report from a Missouri city that is rising up against police murder, despite every effort by authorities to silence them.

  • One step forward for Rasmea

    Supporters of the Palestinian-American leader are holding a call-in day after getting some good news about the case.

  • Living under occupation in Ferguson

    The majority Black city has been rocked by protests against police murder--and the response of authorities has been to commit more violence.

  • Ali Abunimah won't be silenced

    When the Evanston library tried to cancel a Palestinian author's speech, activists proved that solidarity is stronger than censorship.

  • Beaten by police for staying on the phone

    A Chicago woman was beaten by several police until she was unconscious--but she's the one facing assault charges.

  • A Missouri city erupts against police murder

    The killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a cop in Ferguson, Mo., ignited the bitter outrage of the community--and of millions more people.

  • How being pro-Palestine got a professor fired

    An Arab-American scholar and public critic of Israeli colonialism was fired from his new job at the University of Illinois.

  • When torture goes unpunished

    Obama openly used the word "torture" to describe U.S. actions after 9/11--but don't expect anyone to be held accountable.

  • A day of rage for Gaza

    Even as a new cease-fire between Israel and Palestine took effect, activists in cities across the U.S. protested Israel's brutality.

  • Fired for protesting Israel's war

    A prominent Palestinian American scholar has been fired from a new university position for criticizing the assault on Gaza.

  • Toledo is a warning sign

    Man-made factors like the overuse of fertilizers and the ever-present drive for profit are to blame for the water crisis in Toledo.

  • Why is Toledo afraid to take a drink?

    The fourth-largest city in Ohio was without safe water last weekend--but this was no natural disaster.

  • The ongoing betrayal of Native nations

    Barack Obama's visit to a Native American reservation was long awaited, but his presidency has upheld the status quo.

  • Speaking out for Israel's smallest victims

    A Palestine solidarity demonstration in Madison humanized the children who have died under Israeli missiles.

  • UC sells out to apartheid

    The Clal Group is deeply invested in Israeli apartheid and occupation, and should have no place at the University of Chicago.

  • The de Blasio balance sheet

    New York Mayor Bill de Blasio came into office on a wave of progressive hope. After six months, what has he accomplished?

  • Poor people: Use the rear door

    Why would a Manhattan building with a separate, rear entrance for low-income people--a "poor door"--receive city subsidies?