Series: A Users Guide to Marxism

SocialistWorker.org contributors show how the concepts of the Marxist tradition help socialists answer questions about the modern world.
  • The myth of the leaders and the led

    Are people products of their society or shapers of it? Or both? The first installment of our "User's Guide to Marxism" provides some answers.

  • Are people naturally xenophobic?

    According to conventional wisdom, Donald Trump's xenophobia is a cruder form of a trait we all share because it's built into our human nature.

  • Do protests matter?

    It's often difficult for ordinary people to imagine we can have an impact on how society is organized. Mass protests can aid our imaginations.

  • Where did capitalism come from?

    We're taught that capitalism is natural and built into "human nature," but things look different without the green-tinted glasses.

  • What do we mean by a "united front"?

    If revolutionary socialists are a minority among non-revolutionaries, on what terms should they seek united work in struggles?

  • Why are there still famines?

    Modern technology has made it possible to grow enough food to feed everyone in the world. So why is the UN reporting the worst famine since 1945?

  • Why the NGOs won't lead the revolution

    Even organizations that do good work and attempt to be accountable face a limitation: They are only addressing the symptoms, not the cause.

  • How do we build political power?

    Electoral politics can help socialists spread our ideas, but we shouldn't overestimate the importance of running for office under the current system.

  • How free is "free" labor?

    Karl Marx showed that the capitalist "free" market masked a hidden coercion: Workers are free to work--or free to starve.