Books and Entertainment

  • Lives stolen as they played on a beach

    The four Bakr children were killed in an Israeli strike on one of the precious few places in Gaza a child can roam freely.

  • It was a very bad year

    The collapse of whole cities in 1177 B.C. isn't remembered today--but it might well become a common reference point.

  • The struggle for Silvertown

    John Tully's history of a defeated strike in 1889 London reveals how the industrial era was built on the backs of workers.

  • A different cancer story

    A broad sense of community raises Mike Marqusee's The Price of Experience above other cancer survival memoirs.

  • The World Cup crackdown

    The World Cup story the U.S. media won't tell is about an angry population terrorized into compliance by the Brazilian government.

  • Dramatizing the gulag state

    Orange Is the New Black focuses on one of the fastest-growing demographics in our sprawling prison empire: women.

  • Exporting Gaza to the favelas

    Who is supplying Brazil with the high-tech weapons used for World Cup security? The answer can be found in Haifa, Israel.

  • Another world (cup) is possible

    Brazil's Dance with the Devil isn't just about how governments exploit spectacles like the World Cup, but how people fight back.

  • King Lear's journey from regal to radical

    William Shakespeare's famous play is a portrait of a ruling class in crisis--and a monarch who learns to see all of society.

  • Imagine all the people...

    A new book considers what life would be like in the U.S. if there was both economic and a real political democracy.

  • Struggling to be seen

    Challenges to the sports-powers-that-be from Brazil to Washington, D.C., have shown the determination of indigenous peoples.

  • Not just kid stuff

    Young and old and everyone in between should make the time to see--and read--John Green's The Fault in Our Stars.

  • The most repulsive man in football

    Even if you have no interest in football, even if you have never watched a single game, you need to hate Sepp Blatter.

  • For a football without FIFA

    We control nothing of the "beautiful game" we produce, from the pitch to the stadium to the stores full of gear.

  • Obviously, and without regret

    For once, there's a Hollywood film that treats having an abortion not as an agonizing decision, but as a simple fact of life.

  • Who's using the World Cup?

    The obscene costs, corruption, displacement and militarization of the World Cup is doing all the work of "riling people up."

  • A historic goal for Palestine

    After 86 years of frustration, the Palestinian national soccer team is taking the hopes of its people to the international stage.

  • Pelé said what?

    The fact that the legend felt compelled to speak out about Brazil's carnival of injustice shows how deep the crisis runs.

  • Greenlee's blueprint for revolt

    Sam Greenlee, the creator of the book and movie The Spook Who Sat by the Door, wrote from his own experiences.

  • King of the monsters?

    Does the 2014 Godzilla movie live up to the legacy of the 1954 Japanese original, an explicit warning about nuclear dangers?

  • Shining a light on soccer's invisible dictators

    Protests, strikes and direct actions have been erupting across Brazil as the 2014 FIFA World Cup approaches.

  • The innermost secret

    A book by Peter Hudis attempts to uncover in Marx's writings his vision of a new society and its key elements.

  • The Package King's faithful Teamster

    Dave Beck, leader of the West Coast Teamsters, was responsible for initiating the union's cozy relationship with UPS.

  • The wolf of Crenshaw

    As far as his fellow owners are concerned, Donald Sterling's sin is he couldn't contain his bigotry to acceptable targets.

  • Working from the same playbook

    The real fear that beats in the hearts of pro sports team owners is they, too, may be judged by their "pattern of behavior."