Books and Entertainment

  • The re-victimization of Janay Rice

    Among the questions asked after the release of a video showing Ray Rice committing assault, one was glaringly missing.

  • Shore leave for capital

    A new book by John Urry called Offshoring presents a concise history of a quarter-century of globalization.

  • You can't unsee it

    A group of high-profile broadcasters and reporters say they will refuse to use the name of the Washington football team.

  • The real distraction in the NFL

    It seems like a lot of NFL executives are so fearful that they're unwilling to improve their teams by signing Michael Sam.

  • Native voices won't be bullied

    It's no surprise when Sarah Palin agrees with football owner Dan Snyder that a racial slur should be an NFL brand.

  • Still trapped in the Jungle

    A theatrical adaptation of Upton Sinclair's classic novel on stage in Chicago is bold, stunning and unabashedly radical.

  • Confronting the facts about Ferguson

    Sports fans cheering the Little League World Series champions should think about the sports hero they're named after.

  • Kollontai rediscovered

    A recently republished biography of Alexandra Kollontai offers an important examination of the contributions of this important revolutionary.

  • Seeing through the chairman's new clothes

    Pierre Ryckmans was one of the few authors on the left during the 1960s and '70s to criticize China's Cultural Revolution.

  • A cosmic joy to watch

    The movie Guardians of the Galaxy is a good-natured, funny and unapologetically escapist summer spectacle.

  • Racism killed Mike Brown

    Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's essay on Ferguson focused powerfully on the issue of class inequality--but he left something out.

  • An NBA breakthrough

    Becky Hammon will become the first full-time female assistant coach in any major professional men's sport in the U.S.

  • Why does bigotry endure?

    An author and political science professor describes the sources of bigotry as it has emerged in history, up to the current day.

  • At least my hospital isn't being bombed

    No part of Israel's merciless war on Gaza is more unconscionable than its targeting of Palestinian hospitals.

  • A call to arms for our schools

    Mark Naison's Badass Teachers Unite! provides a full-throated defense of public education--and a vision to change it.

  • The NFL's violence against women problem

    With its non-punishment of Ray Rice, the NFL is sending a message that the worth of women is at best negligible.

  • Lives stolen as they played on a beach

    The four Bakr children were killed in an Israeli strike on one of the precious few places in Gaza a child can roam freely.

  • It was a very bad year

    The collapse of whole cities in 1177 B.C. isn't remembered today--but it might well become a common reference point.

  • The struggle for Silvertown

    John Tully's history of a defeated strike in 1889 London reveals how the industrial era was built on the backs of workers.

  • A different cancer story

    A broad sense of community raises Mike Marqusee's The Price of Experience above other cancer survival memoirs.

  • The World Cup crackdown

    The World Cup story the U.S. media won't tell is about an angry population terrorized into compliance by the Brazilian government.

  • Dramatizing the gulag state

    Orange Is the New Black focuses on one of the fastest-growing demographics in our sprawling prison empire: women.

  • Exporting Gaza to the favelas

    Who is supplying Brazil with the high-tech weapons used for World Cup security? The answer can be found in Haifa, Israel.

  • Another world (cup) is possible

    Brazil's Dance with the Devil isn't just about how governments exploit spectacles like the World Cup, but how people fight back.

  • King Lear's journey from regal to radical

    William Shakespeare's famous play is a portrait of a ruling class in crisis--and a monarch who learns to see all of society.