Economy

  • How the banks got us coming and going

    After marketing millions of lousy mortgages, the banks are now breaking the law in their rush to foreclose.

  • The two Americas

    With poverty on the rise and long-term unemployment at record levels, most families in the U.S. are scrambling to get by. But some are doing just fine.

  • The cuts that will leave nothing behind

    State budget cuts in social services are so deep that many programs and agencies are disappearing--precisely at a moment when they're needed most.

  • The baddest Apple in a rotten bunch

    Apple Computer scrambled to the top of the high-tech heap by exploiting sweatshop labor and following a cutthroat marketing strategy.

  • Headed for a double dip?

    After weeks of the White House touting a recovery, the latest jobs numbers and a Federal Reserve statement have put a spotlight on the weak economy.

  • Philanthrobbery

    Bill Gates and Warren Buffett have gotten 40 billionaires to take the "Giving Pledge." But the truth is the rest of us are getting taken.

  • Banking on hunger

    Goldman Sachs gambled on food, and its bets paid off big--at the cost of an international food crisis that inflicted hunger on hundreds of millions.

  • Letting Wall Street off the hook

    At a time when the public holds Wall Street in contempt, the Democratic Congress managed to pass a law that caters to the banksters.

  • Part 2

    The human recession

    We're dealing with a protracted slump in which all the classic neoliberal tactics of attacking the working class are being intensified.

  • Part 1

    The mutating crisis of global capitalism

    This is an economic crisis that keeps mutating, generating new kinds of illnesses in the system--so with every "cure" comes signs of damage elsewhere.

  • A "get out of jail free" card for Wall Street

    It's clear that Wall Street and its army of lobbyists won the battle to keep financial reform legislation from making any real changes at the big banks.

  • The return of austerity

    After spending trillions to prop up the banks and other financial institutions, governments spooked by the Greek debt crisis are cutting social spending.

  • Rescuing Greece or the banks?

    A $1 trillion bailout from the European Union will prop up the euro and big banks--while workers in Greece and beyond suffer huge cuts in living standards.

  • Inside the Goldman Sachs scam

    The world is getting a clearer view of the operations of a giant bank aptly described as a "giant vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity."

  • The banker robbers

    The SEC lawsuit accusing Goldman Sachs of fraud sheds a whole new light on the colossal--and ongoing--looting of the economy by Wall Street.

  • The hedge fund parasites

    While workers were reeling from the Great Recession, the top 25 hedge fund managers in the U.S. earned an incredible $25.3 billion in one year.

  • Blackmailed by the bankers

    For years to come, the growth in public debt will be used by governments as an excuse to impose cuts on workers.

  • First time thievery, second time farce

    First, the banks drained your wallet. Now the people who stood by and let it happen are about to be rewarded, if Senate Democrats get their way.

  • The banksters bet on bankruptcy

    Greece stands on the edge of financial collapse--and questions are emerging about how large banks made the crisis worse, and then profited off it.

  • Stuck at the bottom and no way up

    The coming generation of young workers faces much more difficult conditions--but their ideas are being shaped by a broad discontent with capitalism.

  • A recovery that leaves workers behind

    Growth has returned to the U.S. economy--for now--but working people are still being hammered by joblessness and low wages.

  • Speaking truth to Davos

    As political and business leaders gather for their annual meeting at the ultra-exclusive Swiss ski resort of Davos, the left is holding a gathering of its own.

  • Laughing all the way to the bank

    Despite bonuses expected to exceed $100 billion, Wall Street executives somehow kept a straight face when they testified before Congress.

  • Deadly cost of heating cutoffs

    Three lives lost over a $181 utility bill--that's the ugly truth in Detroit, where a house fire killed three people on January 5.

  • Still a government for bankers

    It was revealed last month that the Bank of England handed £61.6 billion to two banks--while executives kept stuffing their pockets.